Italy’s Fiat 500

The World’s Most Charming Car

Fiat 500c in Palazzo Tronconi’s courtyard photo by  Lynette Michael

Fiat 500c in Palazzo Tronconi’s courtyard photo by Lynette Michael

In 1955, in the park of the Stupinigi Royal Hunting Lodge, just outside of Torino, Dante Giacosa unveiled an entire range of new Fiat models in plain view.  Among them was what would become a cult classic and national hero—the Fiat 500.  

The car was marketed as ‘The Second Best Shape in Italy’ and was only to be rivalled by the likes of Loren and Lollobrigida. The first Fiat 500 posters read, “If it were a lady, it would get its bottom pinched.” 

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The 500’s fuel efficiency and chic Italian styling made the car desirable. The whole world wanted it. Full of personality from the the painted pressed metal wheels to its beautifully rounded lines, canvas roof, and recessed headlights, its design won Dante Giacosa the prestigious Golden Compass award in 1959.  

A little car that had a huge impact on the daily life of an entire generation, the Fiat 500 was about confidence and freedom.  It played a major role in bringing hope to war-torn Italy.  It meant access to better jobs, broader horizons, and a new life.  It made a promise of better times and it delivered

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Ciociaria

Food Tour Italy - A Visit to an Artisan Buffalo Mozzarella farm

Few countries are so renowned for their culinary delights as Italy, our holiday experiences allow you to discover fine biodynamic wines and delicious organic food in the most beautiful of landscapes.

Buffalo Mozzarella

Buffalo Mozzarella

Located in the countryside of Arce, on the banks of the stunning Liri, is an artisan cheese factory. A tour that has been specially designed to show the stages of production, including the breeding and grazing of dairy animals. Here you will be shown the production
process of dairy products, understanding the complexity of every stage following a traditional recipe.

Buffalo Mozarella Farm

Buffalo Mozarella Farm

You will see the skill involved and the work of miracles to produce this delicious delicacy. Who would have thought you could learn how buffalo Mozzarella is made in a
morning? Followed by a tasting with a drizzle of local extra virgin olive oil and bread.

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Within our 3,5 and 7 day holidays we also offer to take you to a choice of guided memorable trips to handpicked places of interest and beauty. Book an experience or create your own. View our PRICE LIST or contact us below to discuss different a tailormade holiday option

Palazzo Tronconi's First Biodynamic Sparkling Wine

'Ancestrale'

It seemed fitting that we should name our first sparkling wine 'Ancestrale' after the oldest natural method of sparkling wine production.

Sparkling wine was first produced using this ancient method almost 400 years ago by monks in the monastery of Sainte Hilaire in France. 

It is a technique that is very difficult to control and requires great skill to produce but at Palazzo Tronconi we are hoping for a very unique, natural aromatic wine. 

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For the base wine we chose our unknown grape variety 'pampanaro', the hand picked grapes were harvested earlier than normal to preserve acidity. Part of the must was taken and refrigerated for six months. The remainder was left to complete the wine making process. 

In March we blended the two together here at our winery in Arce,  we bottled on the same day allowing the fermentation process to commence, trapping the CO2 in the bottle. 

Unlike other wine and champagne making methods, no sulphites, yeasts and sugars are added to the secondary fermentation. Using the ancestral method fermentation occurs in the bottle using up much of the remaining natural sugar and yeasts to produce a fresh, dryish and delicious biodynamic sparkling wine. 

We are hoping Ancestrale will be available in October to toast our 2017 harvest. In the meantime we have to allow nature to take it's course.